Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico

Publication Year:
2001
Usage 194
Abstract Views 190
Downloads 4
Repository URL:
http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2001-THESIS-F63
Author(s):
Folsom, Wendy Ann
Publisher(s):
Texas A&M University
Tags:
agricultural education.; Major agricultural education.
thesis / dissertation description
The purpose of this bi-national study was to determine the type, nature, and extent of existing extension and technology-transfer activities provided to livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in south Texas and three states of northeast Mexico. The researcher from Texas A&M University and a co-principal investigator from Tamaulipas, Mexico worked together to conduct the study on both sides of the border. Conclusions were drawn to provide suggestions about opportunities for increased effectiveness and collaboration among forage-based service providers. Data were collected from two samples in Spring and Summer 2001 using questionnaires. A sample of 92 livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers was selected from south Texas and northeast Mexico. The second sample consisted of 44 individuals and organizations that provided services for livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in the region. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to collect and analyze data. The following were among the findings. The most common types of activities offered by forage-based service providers in the private sector were sales, credit, and veterinary services. Among service providers in the public sector, the most common types of services included animal management practices and forage/plant production practices. Service providers used a combination of mass media and interpersonal channels of communication. In south Texas, livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers most commonly used information from government or university sources. In northeast Mexico, the most commonly used sources of information were unions or associations. The most trusted sources of information for the overall region were government and university sources, friends or other producers, and unions or associations. Producers more commonly used interpersonal channels of communication than mass media channels. Recommendations were made based on these findings for use by individuals and organizations seeking to effect change among livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in south Texas and northeast Mexico.