Erich Kretschmann as a proto-logical-empiricist: Adventures and misadventures of the point-coincidence argument

Citation data:

Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, ISSN: 1355-2198, Vol: 44, Issue: 2, Page: 115-134

Publication Year:
2013
Usage 506
Downloads 413
Abstract Views 91
Link-outs 2
Captures 6
Readers 4
Exports-Saves 2
Social Media 1
Tweets 1
Citations 4
Citation Indexes 4
Repository URL:
http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/id/eprint/10158
DOI:
10.1016/j.shpsb.2012.11.004
Author(s):
Marco Giovanelli
Publisher(s):
Elsevier BV, Elsevier
Tags:
Arts and Humanities, Physics and Astronomy
Most Recent Tweet View All Tweets
article description
The present paper attempts to show that a 1915 article by Erich Kretschmann must be credited not only for being the source of Einstein's point-coincidence, but also for having anticipated the main lines of the logical-empiricist interpretation of general relativity. Whereas Kretschmann was inspired by the work of Mach and Poincaré, Einstein inserted Kretschmann's point-coincidence parlance into the context of Ricci and Levi-Civita's absolute differential calculus. Kretschmann himself realized this and turned the point-coincidence argument against Einstein in his second and more famous 1918 paper. While Einstein had taken nothing from Kretschmann but the expression “point-coincidences”, the logical empiricists, however, instinctively dragged along with it the entire apparatus of Kretschmann's conventionalism. Disappointingly, in their interpretation of general relativity, the logical empiricists unwittingly replicated some epistemological remarks Kretschmann had written before general relativity even existed.

This article has 0 Wikipedia mention.