Adverse neonatal outcomes in relation to ambient temperatures at birth: A nationwide survey in Taiwan.

Citation data:

Archives of environmental & occupational health, ISSN: 1933-8244, Page: 1-8

Publication Year:
2017

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PMID:
28409661
DOI:
10.1080/19338244.2017.1299084
Author(s):
Weng, Yi-Hao, Yang, Chun-Yuh, Chiu, Ya-Wen
Publisher(s):
Informa UK Limited
Tags:
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics, Environmental Science, Medicine
article description
This study investigated the temperature-specific risks of adverse neonatal outcomes in Taiwan. Over 2 million births between 2001 and 2010 were correlated with the daily mean outdoor temperatures at birth. A log-binomial model was used to estimate the risk of adverse neonatal outcomes in relation to ambient temperature at birth after adjusting for possible confounders. There was a significant correlation of temperature extremes with stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Maternal exposure to temperature extremes carried greater risks of stillbirth (> 23.4°C), preterm birth (< 19.5°C and > 25.4°C), and low birth weight (< 15.5°C and > 23.4°C) than did temperatures of 21.5°C∼23.4°C. In conclusion, infants born to women exposed to temperature extremes possess greater risks for stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight. The data suggest optimal temperatures to minimize overall adverse neonatal outcomes are 21.5°C∼23.4°C.

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