A Comparison of the Natural History of HPV Infection and Cervical Abnormalities among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women in Senegal, Africa.

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Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, ISSN: 1538-7755, Vol: 26, Issue: 6, Page: 886-894

Publication Year:
2017
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PMID:
28515108
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.epi-16-0700
Author(s):
Whitham, Hilary K, Hawes, Stephen E, Chu, Haitao, Oakes, J Michael, Lifson, Alan R, Kiviat, Nancy B, Sow, Papa Salif, Gottlieb, Geoffrey S, Ba, Selly, Sy, Marie P, Kulasingam, Shalini L Show More Hide
Publisher(s):
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
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Medicine
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article description
There is evidence of an interaction between HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) resulting in increased HPV-associated morbidity and cancer mortality among HIV-positive women. This study aims to determine how the natural history of cervical HPV infection differs by HIV status. A total of 1,320 women (47% were positive for HIV-1 and/or HIV-2) were followed for an average of two years in Senegal, West Africa between 1994 and 2010. Cytology (with a sub-sample of histology) and HPV DNA testing were performed at approximately 4-month intervals yielding data from over 7,900 clinic visits. Competing risk modeling was used to estimate rates for transitioning between three clinically relevant natural history stages: Normal, HPV, and HSIL (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions). Among HIV-positive women, exploratory univariate analyses were conducted examining the impact of HPV type, infection with multiple HPV types, HIV type, CD4 count, and age. HIV-positive women had higher rates of progression and lower rates of regression compared with HIV-negative women (i.e., adverse transitions). HIV-positive women had a 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.69-3.86; < 0.0001] times higher rate of progression from HPV to HSIL than HIV-negative women (with 24-month absolute risks of 0.18 and 0.07, respectively). Among HIV-positive women, HPV-16/18 infection and CD4 count <200/mm were associated with adverse transitions. Adverse HIV effects persist throughout HPV natural history stages. In the limited-resource setting of sub-Saharan Africa where cervical cancer screening is not widely available, the high-risk population of HIV-positive women may be ideal for targeted screening. .

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