Measuring what matters in delivering services to remote-dwelling Indigenous mothers and infants in the Northern Territory, Australia.

Citation data:

The Australian journal of rural health, ISSN: 1440-1584, Vol: 20, Issue: 4, Page: 228-37

Publication Year:
2012
Usage 2979
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Repository URL:
https://researchbank.acu.edu.au/fhs_pub/2190
PMID:
22827433
DOI:
10.1111/j.1440-1584.2012.01279.x
Author(s):
Steenkamp, Malinda; Rumbold, Alice R; Kildea, Susan V; Bar-Zeev, Sarah J; Kruske, Sue; Dunbar, Terry; Barclay, Lesley
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell
Tags:
Medicine
article description
In the Northern Territory, 64% of Indigenous births are to remote-dwelling mothers. Delivering high-quality health care in remote areas is challenging, but service improvements, informed by participative action research, are under way. Evaluation of these initiatives requires appropriate indicators. Few of the many existing maternal and infant health indicators are specifically framed for the remote context or exemplify an Indigenous consumer perspective. We aimed to identify an indicator framework with appropriate indicators to demonstrate improvements in health outcomes, determinants of health and health system performance for remote-dwelling mothers and infants from pregnancy to first birthday.