Mapping legume roots can determine best performing crops

Publication Year:
2015
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Repository URL:
https://scholars.wlu.ca/clearlanguage/4; http://scholars.wlu.ca/clearlanguage/1; https://scholars.wlu.ca/clearlanguage/6; https://scholars.wlu.ca/clearlanguage/5; https://scholars.wlu.ca/clearlanguage/2
Author(s):
Kitaev, Vladimir; Ritter (nee Cathcart), Nicole
Tags:
Image analysis; analysis software; nodule density; root systems; plant growth; crops.; Aggression; bullying; cyberbullying; electronic aggression; proactive/reactive aggression; online; Internet.; Silver nanoparticles; chemical detection; Raman Spectroscopy; nanoflowers; medical diagnostics; clear language summary; wilfrid laurier university; knowledge mobilization; Lesbian; gay; and bisexual students; exclusion; campus climate; academic performance; resilience.; Child Psychology; Educational Leadership; Educational Psychology; Social Work; Biology; Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing; Software Engineering; Applied Behavior Analysis; Social Psychology; Chemistry; Community Psychology; Social Policy
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article description
Legume plants have a mutually beneficial relationship with bacteria. These beneficial bacteria live in nodules found on plant roots. Until recently there was no way to systematically measure the roots the nodules are found on and to place accurately the nodules on these roots. The research team created software and a method to measure multiple root parameters which were not available previously. This allows different plant varieties to be compared with precise measurements of the root structure in order to figure out which plants will grow better.