Guidance, Navigation and Control System for Autonomous Proximity Operations and Docking

Citation data:

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Publication Year:
2009

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Repository URL:
http://scholarsmine.mst.edu/mec_aereng_facwork/2445
Author(s):
Lee, D.; Pernicka, Henry J.
Publisher(s):
ProQuest
Tags:
Aerospace Engineering; Mechanical Engineering
book description
This study develops an integrated guidance, navigation and control system for use in autonomous proximity operations and docking of spacecraft. A new approach strategy is proposed based on a modified system developed for use with the International Space Station. It is composed of three "V-bar hops" in the closing transfer phase, two periods of stationkeeping and a "straight line V-bar" approach to the docking port. Guidance, navigation and control functions are independently designed and are then integrated in the form of linear Gaussian-type control. The translational maneuvers are determined through the integration of the state-dependent Riccati equation control formulated using the nonlinear relative motion dynamics with the weight matrices adjusted at the steady state condition. The reference state is provided by a guidance function, and the relative navigation is performed using a rendezvous laser vision system and a vision sensor system, where a sensor mode change is made along the approach in order to provide effective navigation. The rotational maneuvers are determined through a linear quadratic Gaussian-type control using star trackers and gyros, and a vision sensor. The attitude estimation mode change is made from absolute estimation to relative attitude estimation during the stationkeeping phase inside the approach corridor. The rotational controller provides the precise attitude control using weight matrices adjusted at the steady state condition, including the uncertainty of the moment of inertia and external disturbance torques. A six degree-of-freedom simulation demonstrates that the newly developed GNC system successfully autonomously performs proximity operations and meets the conditions for entering the final docking phase.