Attitudes toward a game-based approach to mental health.

Citation data:

Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking, ISSN: 2152-2723, Vol: 18, Issue: 1, Page: 20-4

Publication Year:
2015
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Repository URL:
https://stars.library.ucf.edu/facultybib2010/6639
PMID:
25584727
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2014.0382
Author(s):
Kreutzer, Christine P; Bowers, Clint A
Publisher(s):
Mary Ann Liebert Inc; Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot Street, 3rd Floor New Rochelle, NY 10801 USA
Tags:
Psychology; Social Sciences; Computer Science; SELF-EFFICACY; TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS; PERCEIVED EASE; MOTIVATION; PERFORMANCE; TECHNOLOGY; ACCEPTANCE; MEDIATOR; IRAQ; Psychology; Social
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article description
Based on preliminary research, game-based treatments appear to be a promising approach to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, attitudes toward this novel approach must be better understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if video game self-efficacy mediates the relationship between expectations and reactions to a game-based treatment for PTSD. Participants played the serious game "Walk in My Shoes" (Novonics Corp., Orlando, FL) and completed a series of scales to measure attitudes toward the intervention. Video game self-efficacy was found to be a partial mediator of expectancies and reactions. These results suggest that enhancing attitudes via self-efficacy in a clinical setting may maximize treatment effectiveness.