Direct perception of animal mind

Citation data:

The Science Journal of the Lander College of Arts and Sciences, Vol: 2, Issue: 14, Page: 9

Publication Year:
2017
Usage 312
Downloads 174
Abstract Views 138
Repository URL:
https://animalstudiesrepository.org/animsent/vol2/iss14/5; https://touroscholar.touro.edu/sjlcas/vol7/iss1/9; https://touroscholar.touro.edu/sjlcas/vol6/iss1/7; https://touroscholar.touro.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1094&context=sjlcas; https://touroscholar.touro.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1116&context=sjlcas
Author(s):
Shilcrat, Sara
Publisher(s):
Touro Scholar
Tags:
atopic dermatitis; epidermal barrier defects; t cells; systemic lupus erythematosus; CD4+ CD25+ Tregs; Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases; Immune System Diseases; Cognition and Perception; Cognitive Neuroscience; Ethics and Political Philosophy; Evolution; Life Sciences; Philosophy of Mind; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology; Zoology
article description
Kujala’s (2017) target article is ostensibly focused on how everyday folk (fail to) make sense of canine emotions. However, the theories outlined in the article apply to making sense of all aspects of the mentality of both human and non-human animals. The target article neglects the fundamental arguments surrounding the problem of other minds. I explore the relevant arguments and briefly review approaches suggesting that our everyday-life sense that both human and non-human animals are thinking, feeling, emotional beings has a secure epistemological basis.