Raman spectroscopy detects distant invasive brain cancer cells centimeters beyond MRI capability in humans.

Citation data:

Biomedical optics express, ISSN: 2156-7085, Vol: 7, Issue: 12, Page: 5129-5137

Publication Year:
2016
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Repository URL:
https://digitalcommons.dartmouth.edu/facoa/1701
PMID:
28018730
DOI:
10.1364/boe.7.005129
PMCID:
PMC5175557
Author(s):
Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Leblond, Frederic; Petrecca, Kevin
Publisher(s):
The Optical Society
Tags:
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology; Physics and Astronomy; clinical applications; raman spectroscopy; tissue characterization; Bioimaging and Biomedical Optics; Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Engineering; Medicine and Health Sciences; Neurology; Surgery
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article description
Surgical treatment of brain cancer is limited by the inability of current imaging capabilities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect the entirety of this locally invasive cancer. This results in residual cancer cells remaining following surgery, leading to recurrence and death. We demonstrate that intraoperative Raman spectroscopy can detect invasive cancer cells centimeters beyond pathological T1-contrast-enhanced and T2-weighted MRI signals. This intraoperative optical guide can be used to detect invasive cancer cells and minimize post-surgical cancer burden. The detection of distant invasive cancer cells beyond MRI signal has the potential to increase the effectiveness of surgery and directly lengthen patient survival.