An Examination of Individual Behavioral Responses to the Fear of Crime

Publication Year:
2004
Usage 10
Downloads 7
Abstract Views 3
Repository URL:
https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/studentwork/2126
Author(s):
McCarty, William P.
Tags:
Social Sciences; Psychology
thesis / dissertation description
This research used data from the 2004 Omaha Conditions Survey to examine the relationship between the fear of crime and individual behavioral reactions to that fear. This research analyzed both protective and collective responses to the fear of crime. The analyses related both individual characteristics and neighborhood crime rates to protective and collective behavioral responses to the fear of crime. The research evaluated the effects of individual characteristics and neighborhood crime rates on reactions to the fear of crime using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM). The fear of crime was found to have a statistically significant effect on individuals owning a dog for protection, owning a gun for protection, installing special locks, and keeping residence lights on at night. The fear of crime did not have a statistically significant effect on individuals participating in collective behaviors. The violent crime rate did have a statistically significant effect on the influence of the fear of crime on owning a gun, installing special locks, and installing a security system. For other behaviors tested, the violent crime rate had inconsistent effects on the influence of the fear of crime and on the intercepts of the equations. For the most part, the results supported the assertion that the reality of violent crime in an area elevates the intensity of the reactions to the fear of crime.