Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior among Black College Students: Examining the Impact of Distress Tolerance and Social Support on Suicidality

Publication Year:
2015
Usage 206
Downloads 133
Abstract Views 73
Repository URL:
https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1531
Author(s):
Thomas, Anisha L
Tags:
self-harm; social support; suicide; Child Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Community Psychology; Psychology
thesis / dissertation description
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the role of distress tolerance in suicidality among Black college students. It was hypothesized that (1) individuals with low levels of distress tolerance would report higher levels of suicide ideation; (2) individuals with high levels of distress tolerance would report greater suicide attempts; (3) social support would moderate the relationship between distress tolerance and suicide ideation; (4) social support would moderate the relationship between distress tolerance and suicide attempts; and that (5) family and peer support would act as distinct buffers against suicidality. These hypotheses were tested by surveying 47 undergraduate university students (female = 49%; mean age = 22.45). Participants completed packets with self-report measures that included: the Self-Harm Behavior Questionnaire, the Distress Tolerance Scale, the Child and Adolescent Social Support, and demographics. Results suggested that individuals with low levels of distress tolerance showed greater history of self-harm behavior when compared to individuals with high levels of distress tolerance. Results indicated that social support moderated the relationship between distress tolerance level and history of self-harm behaviors. Results also indicated that family support acted as significant protective factor against suicidality.