Attitudes toward the integration of smoking cessation treatment into drug abuse clinics.

Citation data:

Journal of substance abuse treatment, ISSN: 0740-5472, Vol: 32, Issue: 1, Page: 53-60

Publication Year:
2007
Usage 369
Abstract Views 363
Link-outs 6
Captures 116
Exports-Saves 84
Readers 32
Citations 85
Citation Indexes 84
Clinical Citations 1
Repository URL:
https://works.bepress.com/douglas_ziedonis/46; https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/psych_pp/217; https://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/bfc7e004-df17-4e92-95b1-92ebd11db93f
PMID:
17175398
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsat.2006.06.011
PMCID:
PMC3496385; 3496385
Author(s):
Fuller, Bret E.; Guydish, Joseph; Tsoh, Janice; Reid, Malcolm S.; Resnick, Michael; Zammarelli, Lucy; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Sears, Clare; McCarty, Dennis
Publisher(s):
Elsevier BV
Tags:
Nursing; Medicine; Psychology; Attitudes; Drug abuse clinics; Smoking cessation treatment; Psychiatry and Mental health; Neuroscience(all); *Ambulatory Care; *Attitude to Health; Delivery of Health Care, Integrated; Humans; Smoking; Smoking Cessation; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry
article description
This article examines the variables associated with the presence of smoking cessation interventions in drug abuse treatment units, as well as staff attitudes toward the integration of smoking cessation services as a component of care. Surveys were administered to 106 organizations, 348 treatment clinics, and 3,786 employees in agencies that participated in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Organizational factors, attributes of the treatment setting, and staff attitudes toward smoking cessation treatment were assessed. Use of smoking cessation interventions was associated with the number of additional services offered at clinics, residential detoxification services, and attitudes of the staff toward smoking cessation treatment. Staff attitudes toward integrating smoking cessation services in drug treatment were influenced by the number of pregnant women admitted, the number of ancillary services provided, the attitudes of staff toward evidence-based practices, and whether smoking cessation treatment was offered as a component of care.