Microgeographic variations in Burkitt's lymphoma incidence correlate with differences in malnutrition, malaria and Epstein-Barr virus.

Citation data:

British journal of cancer, ISSN: 1532-1827, Vol: 103, Issue: 11, Page: 1736-41

Publication Year:
2010
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Citations 14
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Repository URL:
https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/qhs_pp/959; https://works.bepress.com/ann_moormann/38
PMID:
21102592
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605947
PMCID:
PMC2994219
Author(s):
Sumba, Peter O.; Kabiru, E. W.; Namuyenga, E.; Fiore, Nancy; Otieno, R. O.; Moormann, Ann M.; Orago, A. S.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Rochford, Rosemary
Publisher(s):
Springer Nature
Tags:
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology; Medicine; Burkitt Lymphoma; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Glutathione Peroxidase; Herpesvirus 4, Human; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Kenya; Logistic Models; Malaria; Male; Malnutrition; Viral Load; Biostatistics; Epidemiology; Health Services Research; Immunology and Infectious Disease
article description
Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL) has been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and holoendemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria. But recent evidence suggests that other risk factors are involved.