Effects of dried distillers grain with solubles on growing-finishing pig performance

Citation data:

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports, Issue: 10, Page: 103-110

Publication Year:
2006
Usage 9
Downloads 5
Abstract Views 4
Repository URL:
https://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr/vol0/iss10/1125
DOI:
10.4148/2378-5977.6965
Author(s):
Linneen, S K; Gottlob, R O; Main, R G; Tokach, Michael D; DeRouchey, Joel M; Goodband, Robert D; Nelssen, Jim L; Dritz, Steven S
Publisher(s):
New Prairie Press; Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service
Tags:
Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station contribution; no. 08-83-S; Swine day; 2006; Report of progress (Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service); 966; Dried distillers grains; Growing-Finishing pigs; Swine; Other Animal Sciences
article description
Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of increasing dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance and palatability in growing-finishing pigs. In Exp. 1, a total of 1,050 pigs (initially 104.9 lb) were used in a 28-d study in May 2002. Pigs were fed diets with either 0 or 15% DDGS and 0, 3, or 6% added fat, for a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement. Overall, there were no DDGS × fat content interactions (P = 0.20). There was an improvement (linear, P<0.01) in ADG and F/G with increasing added fat and no difference in growth performance between pigs fed 0 or 15% DDGS. In Exp. 2, a total of 1,038 pigs (initially 102.1 lb) were used in a 56-d study in August 2005. Pigs were fed diets with either 0, 10, 20, or 30% DDGS from the same ethanol plant as in Exp. 1. Overall (d 0 to 56), there was a trend for decreased ADG (linear, P<0.10) and ADFI (linear, P<0.06) as DDGS increased. The greatest reduction occurred in pigs fed more than 10% DDGS. In Exp. 3, a total of 120 growing pigs (initially 48.7 lb) were used in a 21-d feed preference study in October 2005. Pigs were randomly allotted to a pen with 4 feeders, each containing a separate dietary treatment. Pigs were offered diets based on corn-soybean meal, with 0, 10, 20, or 30% DDGS from the same source as in Exp. 1 and 2. For all periods (d 0 to 7, 7 to 21, and 0 to 21), there was a decrease in ADFI (quadratic, P<0.01) as DDGS increased in the diet. The most dramatic decrease was observed between 0 and 10% DDGS. Experiment 1 showed no difference in growth performance in pigs fed 0 or 15% DDGS. In Exp 2, at DDGS contents higher than 10%, there were trends for decreased ADG and ADFI; in Exp. 3, ADFI decreased with increasing DDGS in the diet. In summary, DDGS from the ethanol plant tested can be used at 10 to 15% in finishing diets without reducing pig performance. Higher percentages of DDGS in the diet decreased ADFI in growing and finishing pigs.; Swine Day, 2006, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2006