The relationship of biological parent or relative involvement and academic success among special education students

Publication Year:
2002

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Repository URL:
https://rdw.rowan.edu/etd/1489
Author(s):
Murtaugh, James
Tags:
Educational Psychology
thesis / dissertation description
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between biological parent and relative involvement in special education students' lives and academic success. Also investigated was the relationship between biological parent and relative involvement in special education students' lives and the amount of time spent out of the classroom for behavioral reasons. Other variables include age at separation, type of placement, classification, number of siblings, or if the child's home school district was urban or non-urban. Each city of the urban districts examined was also analyzed. Statistical tests were performed to establish correlation between these variables and GPA scores. The subjects were seventy special education students, aged ten through eighteen, who attend a private school in New Jersey. Data was collected from school records to determine if any significant relation exists between the variables. The results suggest the presence of biological parents or relatives in special education students' lives enhance academic success. The results also suggest that those special education students separated for longer amounts of time show less academic success than those students who have lived continuously with one biological parent or relative throughout their lives.