Nature-Part I

Citation data:

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Human Geography, Page: 177-196

Publication Year:
2011
Usage 34
Abstract Views 34
Repository URL:
http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/684
DOI:
10.1002/9781444395839.ch11
Author(s):
Castree, Noel
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell
Tags:
Social Sciences; Education; Social and Behavioral Sciences
book chapter description
In this chapter I want to demonstrate that “nature” is not what it seems to be – at least for the many human geographers who have been writing on the matter since the late 1980s. I put the term in scare-quotes because these geographers – an increasingly prominent and influential group within the discipline – have in different ways sought to question nature’s apparent naturalness. Their writings have endeavored to “de-naturalize” our understandings of those myriad things – birds and bees, genes and glaciers, hippos and hurricanes – to which we routinely attach the label “natural” in one or other sense of this polysemic and polyreferential word. I will explain how and why in the pages that follow.