The Effect of Caloric Labeling on Consumers Calorie Intake

Publication Year:
2017
Usage 9
Abstract Views 9
Repository URL:
https://scholarexchange.furman.edu/scjas/2017/all/86
Author(s):
Nassab, Kate
artifact description
While the addition of calorie count on restaurant menus may seem insignificant, previous studies have shown that the addition of calorie count can lead consumers to choosing a healthier meal. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the impact caloric labeling on a menu can have on a consumer's choices. The independent variable was the menu type, either labeled or not labeled. The dependent variable was the calorie intake. For this study the hypothesis was, if a menu includes calorie count, then the subjects viewing the menu will consume less calories than subjects ordering off the menu without calorie count. The null hypothesis was, if a menu includes calorie count, then the subject viewing the menu will consume the same number of calories as subjects ordering off the menu without calorie count. Out of the forty participants, the first 20 were asked to choose one entree and one drink off of a menu that had calorie labeling, and the other 20 participants were asked to choose one entree and one drink off the not labeled menu. Next, the calories ordered from participants off of the two menus were compared and a T-Test was conducted. The results suggest that on average, participants who had a menu with calorie count ordered fewer calories than participants ordering off of the not labeled menu. The results were proven to be statistically significant and the null hypothesis was rejected.