Letter from Louie [Strentzel] Muir to John Muir, 1893 Jun 15." by Louie [Strentzel] Muir

Citation data:

Original letter dimensions: 17.5 x 23 cm.

Publication Year:
2008

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Repository URL:
https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/jmcl/14261
Author(s):
Louie [Strentzel] Muir
Publisher(s):
University of the Pacific Library Holt-Atherton Special Collections. Please contact this institution directly to obtain copies of the images or permission to publish or use them beyond educational purposes.
Tags:
John Muir; correspondence; letters; author; writing; naturalist; California; correspondent; mail; message; post; exchange of letters; missive; notes; epistle
artifact description
[2]traveling, asking us what will make her “grow the fastest” so she will soon be strong, & able to travel anywhere with Papa! The dear child is really growing rapidly, and plays out in the garden most of the day, for the weather is delightful, cool and bright, and the mosquitos have departed. The “June hot spell” lasted only three days here, but thermometer was 97° the last afternoon. Helen looked very white and languid for a while, but soon a fresh breeze blew from the bay & then she was as sprightly as ever[3]Next day was cold, only 6[4?]°. That same hot day, Dr. Cutlar took his wife and babies out to the ranch for a picnic! & the mosquitos were dreadful; they were all sick that night – the family I mean, & Mrs. C. thought nothing could be more awful than that ranch! Of course the Doctor never thought to take them down to that cool Jasmine-shaded veranda where Aunt Ette swings in a new hammock every afternoon. David & Ette come here every Sunday, & we see Margaret & May very often, all well.01682[6]and what delicious spicy strawberries Mrs. [Ames?] gave us yesterday. Mr. Swett was not far wrong in praising that place so highly. Nearly all the Royal A[illegible] will be shipped tomorrow. I sent the 3 mammoth tusks, the boat & other articles to the Sierra Club, & Arthur went on the steamer with them Elliott McAllister wrote very pleasantly with thanks I shall hope to hear very soon an account of your Boston journey. How I wish we could all have been with you. My eye is tired, so goodbyeLovingly Yours,Louie Muir[in margin: 874]01682