Letter from Geo[rge] G. Mackenzie to [Robert Underwood] Johnson, 1891 " by Geo[rge] G. Mackenzie

Citation data:

Original letter dimensions: 28.5 x 20.5 cm.

Publication Year:
2008

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Repository URL:
https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/jmcl/14513
Author(s):
Geo[rge] G. Mackenzie
Publisher(s):
University of the Pacific Library Holt-Atherton Special Collections. Please contact this institution directly to obtain copies of the images or permission to publish or use them beyond educational purposes.
Tags:
John Muir; correspondence; letters; author; writing; naturalist; California; correspondent; mail; message; post; exchange of letters; missive; notes; epistle
artifact description
[3]For the others who are crying for soldiers – they are simply expectations of profit. I enclose a condensation of the Yosemite commission’s latest report. I have written for copies of the full report, but they have not yet come. You will see that the Commissioners’ advice, to have a company of soldiers at Wawona, is exactly in accordance with what I wrote to you about the Wawona people’s hopes. That advice could be grafted on Mr. [Aeusham?],and through him on Mr. Noble, apparently, but it cannot be grafted on my mind. Nor can it be made acceptable to the California public, which is already beginning to suspect the Park proposition as a sham, got up to enable the present Yosemite monopoly to gather in more money. That better than the military scheme is offered by me? This better: as is well understood by everybody of intelligence who knows the mountains. The reservation should be laid off in districts. Each district should have a patrol of one or two men, picked for their thorough knowledge of the mountains and usage to mountaineer’s life. These men should be under orders of a chief who would be constantly active in supervision. On account of the size and the natural conformation of the land, the least number of districts would be eight. Twelve would be better, but I am reckoning on the least outlay of money. The business of the patrol would be, first, to warn off trespassers and watch for fires. With such a watch the inroads of06359