Letter from J. E. Calkins to John Muir, 1907 Jan.

Citation data:

Original letter dimensions: 27.5 x 20.5 cm., Page: 0

Publication Year:
1907
Usage 1
Abstract Views 1
Repository URL:
https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/jmcl/4851
Author(s):
Calkins, J E
Publisher(s):
University of the Pacific Library Holt-Atherton Special Collections. Please contact this institution directly to obtain copies of the images or permission to publish or use them beyond educational purposes.
Tags:
John Muir; correspondence; letters; author; writing; naturalist; California; correspondent; mail; message; post; exchange of letters; missive; notes; epistle
image description
3,THE DAVENPORT DEMOCRATAND LEADER DAILY SUNDAY AND WEEKLY EDITIONSEDITORIAL ROOMDAVENPORT, IOWAThings as to be able to go back there again-and when we go to the Coast this time it will be to stay. Indeed, I came near being there now. I am just now in the way of returning through passes over two lines of road, both of which died with 1906, and both of which, at the last moment, I allowed to expire unused because my wife could not quite bring herself to think that it was best for me to be adventuring out there while she looked after the hard work of selling out and breaking up back her. But a year brings many things to pass, and among others for which we hope is yet another look at the Sierras and the blue Pacific. It is strange how that sunset country wins on one; here are we, feeling that that is home and that we are unwillingly detained here till can go back to the Coast, where we really live.I have caught myself several times in the act of wondering whether you have ever seen more than a glimpse of the Mississippi and its valley. When I do go to California I should like to take it with me; the river at least, if not the valley. If you have not seen the tender leafage of the first of spring upon the tall trees and their fringing undergrowth along the shores and upon the islands of the upper river, and seen that foliage expand till full grown, and watched the beautiful nacreous colors come and go on the surface of the water on those days when it glides like glass, without a ripple, and felt the mighty strength of the great mile-wide stream beneath you, and against you oar, you have still pleasures in store for the day when you grow tired of mountains and glaciers and cloud-high treetops. There are "cutoffs" that run through these lowlands, thickset with trees that lean into arches overhead and carry great mantles of climbing vines which often show solid walls of smooth green foliage, which are perfect dreams of beauty. There is no sensation that carries with if03809