November 1911-March 1912, Trip to South America, Part III, and Trip to Africa Image 51

Citation data:

Original journal dimensions: 10 x 17 cm.

Publication Year:
1911
Usage 1
Abstract Views 1
Repository URL:
https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/jmj-all/3397
Author(s):
Muir, John
Publisher(s):
Holt-Atherton Special Collections, University of the Pacific Library
Tags:
John Muir; journals; drawings; writings; travel; journaling; naturalist
image description
Wild mountains after leaving the lake plains, through which the railroad has been built at great cost. Twenty or thirty steel trestles over gorgeous and fluting ravines in close succession. Some of the passengers saw a lion by the roadside. Feb. 17.Very cold night. Slept cold, with heavy underclothing, coat and vest, overcoat, and a thick blanket. Elevation of the region about 6000 to 8000 feet above the sea. Colder than the Tuolumne Meadows in the Spring, though 3000 feet higher than here. Passed through dense forests about noon, but the greater part of the way is through grassy hills with only detached patches of brush and trees. Extensive wheat fields here and there. Yesterday afternoon and this forenoon near Nivahsa Station and Lake. This remarkable lake is surrounded by a picturesque mountain and hills. Water said to be fresh, though without any visible outlet. Between Nivasha and Nairobi saw Mt. Kilimanjara and Kenia, and many antelopes and zebra, all within short distances of the railroad, and remarkably tame. The latter most at east as the train rolled past. This afternoon soon after leaving Nairobi saw hundreds or thousands of antelopes, two droves of zebras, and a few ostriches. Some of the antelopes were lying down within a stone’s through of the track, a few of which lay still. Others rose and gazed at the train, and a few ran off to a distance of a quarter of a mile or so. These fine beasts were on a beautiful treeless shrubless plain or prairie. After coming to a plain dotted with small trees and bushes none of the animals were seen. Some parts of the prairie were roughened with moraine bowlders, and some places weathered from