Reading and Writing in Science: How do the Reform Documents Attend to the Fundamental Sense of Science Literacy?

Citation data:

Brigham Young University - Provo

Publication Year:
2006
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Repository URL:
https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/etd/786; https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1785&context=etd
Author(s):
Frandsen, Kimberly J.
Publisher(s):
Brigham Young University - Provo
Tags:
Fundamental Science Literacy; Derived Science Literacy; National Reform Documents; Teacher Education and Professional Development
thesis / dissertation description
The purpose of this study was to examine and describe fundamental literacy messages found within three major science reform documents: Science for all Americans: Project 2061 (AAAS, 1990), Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS, 1993), and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996). A qualitative content analysis was performed in an effort to reveal any messages or statements supporting fundamental science literacy. Results from this study indicate that key science reform documents do in fact contain multiple messages supporting the fundamental sense of science literacy, however, the nature of these messages, the quantity, placement and presence of negative literacy statements may impact the way teachers view or support fundamental literacy skills within the classroom. Implications concerning the role of science educators and science teacher educators are also discussed.