Institutionalized Conflict Resolution: Have We Come to Expect Too Little?

Citation data:

Negotiation Journal, ISSN: 0748-4526, Vol: 18, Issue: 4, Page: 345-350

Publication Year:
2002
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Repository URL:
https://scholarship.law.tamu.edu/facscholar/963
DOI:
10.1111/j.1571-9979.2002.tb00267.x
Author(s):
Welsh, Nancy A.; Coleman, Peter T.
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell
Tags:
Dispute Resolution and Arbitration; Law
book chapter description
Two very different contexts of the conflict resolution field — hostage negotiation and court-connected mediation — do share many similarities, particularly with regard to roles, responsibilities, and techniques. In both contexts, the emphasis is on the short-term “fix”, or solution, rather than attention to the underlying reasons for a conflict and long-term societal change. This emphasis, though perhaps changing in the international relations area, permeates much of the institutionalized conflict resolution field and bears further examination by practitioners and researchers.