The Effect of Competence, Likeability, and Sex on Performance Evaluations of Managers

Publication Year:
2012
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Downloads 1192
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Repository URL:
https://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/etd_theses/4195
Author(s):
Kehn, Connie
Tags:
Competence; Female managers; Likeability; Management; Performance evaluation; Work relationship
thesis / dissertation description
The effects of competence, likeability, and sex of an upper-level manager on his or her performance evaluation and the work relationship with his or her subordinates were examined in the present study. Given that women in leadership positions are frequent victims of prejudice and discrimination, it was of a particular interest to examine how female managers would be evaluated. In a survey of 228 undergraduate students, competence was found to be an important attribute when it came to performance evaluation, whereas likeability was found to be an important attribute when it came to the work relationship. Female managers were found not to be necessarily devalued; when women managers were clearly described as competent, they were evaluated more positively than their male counterparts, regardless of their likeability levels. The results of the present study indicate that competence and likeability are more important attributes than sex to determine performance evaluation and the work relationship between supervisor and subordinate.