WHY ARE CHRONIC DISEASES ON THE RISE? WHAT STEPS NEED TO BE TAKEN IN ORDER FOR HEALTH CARE TO MEET THIS NEW DISEASE BURDEN?

Citation data:

University of Montana Conference on Undergraduate Research (UMCUR)

Publication Year:
2011

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Repository URL:
https://scholarworks.umt.edu/umcur/2011/oralpres3c/3
Author(s):
Hoggatt, Kayla
Publisher(s):
ScholarWorks at University of Montana
textual work description
The World Health Organization (WHO) predicted in 2008 that the number of deaths by non-communicable diseases will increase by 17% in the next ten years. To determine why chronic illness is on the rise, I am examining summaries of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) studies for 1990, 2000, and 2004, which provide evidence-based evaluations of global health. I am exploring the trends associated with the prevalence of chronic (non-communicable) and infectious (communicable) diseases in developing countries by reviewing quantitative data provided in the GBD reports. I will discuss trends based on reasons gathered from previous studies concerning the rise of chronic diseases in the past ten years. I am gathering information from various news articles and journal publications, which have provided many reasons for the changing profile of disease burden, to provide a more comprehensive study on this subject. My preliminary research has indicated that the burden of chronic illness has deeply impacted developing countries that continue to struggle with infectious diseases. Thus, I am particularly interested in the effects that development and globalization have on the prevalence of chronic diseases as well as the continuous spread of infectious diseases. The importance of this research lies with the readiness of developing countries to take on a new burden of chronic illness. If there is to be an influx of chronic diseases in the developing world, healthcare providers must be prepared in advance with new forms of treatment and professional competencies to provide for the health of their growing populations.