Eric C. Donny

Professor, Department of Psychology

Our laboratory uses both animal and human models to examine nicotine/tobacco dependence. Important features of our laboratory are an emphasis on drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior, the translation of information between animal and human research, and the use of multiple levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, developmental, neurobiological, pharmacological). Our current research addresses the public health consequences of smoking and potential regulation of tobacco products by the FDA to reduce the harm caused by cigarettes. In the animal laboratory, we use a rodent model of nicotine self-administration that allows us to study the factors that promote/retard nicotine-taking behavior, the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement, and the influence of other tobacco constituents. In the human laboratory, we examine the potential impact of reduction of nicotine in cigarettes on smoking behavior, mood, cognition, toxicant exposure, tobacco dependence and subjective experience.

Filter...
Filter...
Filter...
Filter...
Filter...
Filter...
Filter...
Filter...