The girl who cried pain: a bias against women in the treatment of pain.

Citation data:

The Journal of law, medicine & ethics : a journal of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, ISSN: 1073-1105, Vol: 29, Issue: 1, Page: 13-27

Publication Year:
2001
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Repository URL:
https://digitalcommons.law.umaryland.edu/fac_pubs/145; https://works.bepress.com/diane_hoffmann/6
SSRN Id:
383803
DOI:
10.2139/ssrn.383803; 10.1111/j.1748-720x.2001.tb00037.x
PMID:
11521267
Author(s):
Hoffmann, Diane E.; Tarzian, Anita J.
Publisher(s):
Elsevier BV; SAGE Publications
Tags:
Nursing; Medicine; women; discrimination; health law; medical ethics; treatment; Bioethics and Medical Ethics; Health Law and Policy
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article description
In general, women report more severe levels of pain, more frequent incidences of pain, and pain of longer duration than men, but are nonetheless treated for pain less aggressively. The authors investigate this paradox from two perspectives: Do men and women in fact experience pain differently - whether biologically, cognitively, and/or emotionally? And regardless of the answer, what accounts for the differences in the pain treatment they receive, and what can we do to correct this situation?