The first whole genome and transcriptome of the cinereous vulture reveals adaptation in the gastric and immune defense systems and possible convergent evolution between the Old and New World vultures.

Citation data:

Genome biology, ISSN: 1474-760X, Vol: 16, Issue: 1, Page: 215

Publication Year:
2015
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Repository URL:
http://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/17822
PMID:
26486310
DOI:
10.1186/s13059-015-0780-4
PMCID:
PMC4618389
Author(s):
Chung, Oksung; Jin, Seondeok; Cho, Yun Sung; Lim, Jeongheui; Kim, Hyunho; Jho, Sungwoong; Kim, Hak-Min; Jun, JeHoon; Lee, HyeJin; Chon, Alvin; Ko, Junsu; Edwards, Jeremy; Weber, Jessica A.; Han, Kyudong; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Manica, Andrea; Bhak, Jong Hwa; Paek, Woon Kee Show More Hide
Publisher(s):
Springer Nature; BIOMED CENTRAL LTD
Tags:
Agricultural and Biological Sciences; Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology; Cinereous vulture; Old world vulture; New world vulture; Transcriptome; Genome; Next-generation sequencing
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article description
The cinereous vulture, Aegypius monachus, is the largest bird of prey and plays a key role in the ecosystem by removing carcasses, thus preventing the spread of diseases. Its feeding habits force it to cope with constant exposure to pathogens, making this species an interesting target for discovering functionally selected genetic variants. Furthermore, the presence of two independently evolved vulture groups, Old World and New World vultures, provides a natural experiment in which to investigate convergent evolution due to obligate scavenging.